Woolston Eyes Monthly Sightings

2014-09-14

On no1 bed, ringing took place on the Thursday evening, Friday and Sunday mornings. On the Thursday, 18 birds were caught with 15 new including single Coal Tit, Willow Tit, Goldcrest and possibly the last Sand Martin of the year. On the Friday morning, Dave Riley and Mike Baron caught 80 birds including 69 new, good numbers of Meadow Pipits were moving through and subsequently 27 were caught, other highlights included three Goldcrests. More Meadow Pipits, 29, were ringed on the Sunday when John Blundell and Mike were joined by Dave Riley, a late Whitethroat was also ringed. Sightings during the sessions included 4 Tawny Owls and 4 Water Rails (11th), 33 Swallows and 1 Nuthatch (12th), 1 Green Sandpiper, 1 Snipe, 100+ Meadow Pipits and 1 Raven (14th).

Ringing on No3 bed was restricted to Friday evening and Sunday morning. On Friday evening Kieran Foster set nets for a Swallow roost that did not materialise and it seems likely that hirundine catching is over for this year, but he did catch four Reed Warblers and a Sedge Warbler. On Sunday morning Kieran was joined by Mike Miles (fresh back from the States the day before), Margaret Rawlins and Chris Piner, they made 125 captures (104 new and 21 retraps) with the star bird being their first Cetti’s Warbler since 2011, they also caught their first Goldcrests of the year as the autumn crest movement kicked in.

Submitted by: Dave Riley

 

2014-09-21

With the settled weather continuing, the No1 team visited on the Monday, Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday. Dave Riley was joined by John Blundell on the Monday, catching 78 birds, with 67 new, including 19 Meadow Pipits and 4 Goldfinches. It was a late start for Dave on the Wednesday (09.30), when he caught 28 birds, the 25 new including another Meadow Pipit and 3 Reed Warblers. The following day, it was a much earlier start for him and he was rewarded with a catch of 79 birds, the 70 new included the first Grey Wagtails (2) to be ringed on the bed since 2001, other highlights of the morning were 14 Blackcaps, 11 Chiffchaffs, 1 Whitethroat and the first decent catch of Long-tailed tits (9) of the year, amongst the retraps was a Jay, originally ringed on 21st October 2012. It was another late start on the Saturday morning when 14 birds were caught, amongst the 11 new were single Coal Tit and Goldfinch, while a retrap Coal Tit had been ringed on 21st June this year. John and Mike Baron were out early on the Sunday morning when they caught 34 birds, among the 32 new was 19 of their target species, Meadow Pipit, taking the annual total for this species to a record breaking 108.

On No3 bed, ringing took place on Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday. The week ended with 208 captures (124 new and 84 retraps) and the highlights included their second Cetti’s Warbler of the autumn, again a bird of the year, and two juvenile Grey Wagtails, as well as the two trapped birds, at least six further Grey Wagtails were seen or heard around the bed. They continue to catch warblers of the four species that are associated with September, the majority having little fat and may be “just in” from sites further north. The arrival of Goldcrests is becoming more noticeable and they ringed five. Sightings during the sessions included a Bittern seen leaving the bed at dawn on Wednesday and flying towards No4 bed, while 25 Black-tailed Godwits, 4 Mistle Thrushes and two Swallows.

Submitted by: Dave Riley

 

2014-09-30

Painted Lady photographed by Paul Hazelhurst today on no.3 bed.

Submitted by: David Spencer

 

2014-09-30

A Marsh Harrier was hunting over No.3 bed mid-morning before flying off east over No.2 bed. A dark individual with only a small crown patch and almost no gold on the forewings. 12 Black-tailed Godwits remained and Bert Lloyd saw a female Pintail early morning. Yesterday there was Treecreeper on the south bank of No.3 near the footbridge.

Submitted by: David Spencer

 

David Bowman

2014-09-29

13 Black-tailed Godwits, 21 Snipe, 1 Water Rail, 1 Kingfisher and 5 Swallows on No.3 bed this afternoon

Photo of a hoverfly from No.3 bed today.

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

Hazel

2014-09-28

Araneus diadematus (Orb Weaver) aka Garden Spider/ Cross Spider

Submitted by: Hazel Rothwell

 

Hazel

2014-09-27

Photo of what I believe to be a Tachinid Fly (Gonia Picea)

Submitted by: Hazel Rothwell

 

Hazel

2014-09-27

Photo of a Wren (two seen) in front of the John Morgan hide; other birds (same area) 2 Dunnock, 1 female Blackcap, 5 Long Tailed Tits and 1 pair Pheasant. Small numbers of Greenfinch on both sets of feeders. Fleeting visit from 1 Kingfisher on perch (scrape area)

Submitted by: Hazel Rothwell

 

David Bowman

2014-09-27

Highlights of today were the two new Cetti’s Warblers, ringed by Kieran Foster et al on No.3 bed this morning, both juveniles, a male and a female. This makes four for the autumn in three weeks, so far, making it the best year yet. Also in No.3 bed were two Water Rails, showing well in front of the Morgan Hide, as was a single Green Sandpiper. At the eastern end of the Reserve, a light passage of 62 Meadow Pipits and 26 Swallows, along with 15 Song Thrushes, were the main signs of migration. As usual, small numbers of Yellowhammers, Reed Buntings and Skylarks were feeding on the arable land by Rixton Paddocks.

Cheers David (with David Spencer, Al Warford, Paul Hazlehurst, Brian Baird, Helen Allan, Diane Shepherd and George Dunbar)

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-21

Snails are extremely common on the Reserve, which is one of the reasons our Song Thrush population is holding its own. This photo was tyaken on No.3 bed.

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-21

This photo is of a Silver-Y Moth, Autographa gamma. It is a common species at Woolston and was taken on No.3 bed.

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-21

This photo of a fly, a Diptera species, hasn’t yet been specifically identified.

It was taken on No.3 bed.

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-21

This photo is of the plant Lords and Ladies, Arum maculatum, also known (amongst other names) as Cuckoo-pint. The berries are highly poisonous to humans, as are most parts of the plant. It was taken on No.3 bed.

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-21

This photo is of Borage Borago officinalis from the North Meadow. Along with the many other seed-bearing plants on planted there, it produces oil-rich seeds and contributes to keeping our birds going in late autumn/winter.

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-21

This photo is of the seed-bearing plant Redshank Polygonum persicaria from the North Meadow. This species, along with a wide variety of other food plants, should help to sustain the seed-eating birds through the winter months.

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-21

This is a photo of a Many-seeded Goosefoot Chenopodium polyspermum one of the many seed bearing plants now providing food for the birds on the North Meadow.

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-20

Another very productive autumn morning, covering from No.3 bed to Rixton Paddocks. The highlights were: 1 Cetti’s Warbler (a female ringed by K.Foster et al), 3 Green Sandpipers, 40 Black-tailed Godwits, 2 Water Rails, 2 Kingfishers, 3 Yellowhammers, 1 Pintail, 17 Wigeons, 23 Snipe, 260 Lapwings, 6 Goldcrests, 1 Sedge Warbler, 1 Whitethroat, 44 Blackbirds, 22 Song Thrushes, 1 Coal Tit, 5 Blackcaps, 10 Chiffchaffs, 12 Skylarks and 1 Nuthatch.

Photo of the Cetti’s Warbler

Cheers David (with David Spencer, Al Warford, Helen Allan and George Dunbar)

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

2014-09-19

Hoverfly identification.

The fly on the yellow flowers (posted twice) looks like Eristalsis horticola. It is found near trees and bushes between April and October and is common. I have a new book “A Comprehensive Guide to Insects of Britain and Ireland by Paul D Brock published this year by Pisces Publications.. It has 2,700 photographs and claims to be the most comprehensive available.

Submitted by: Douglas Buchanan

 

David Bowman

2014-09-19

A couple of hours this afternoon produced 1 Hobby, 1 Green Sandpiper, 4 Black-tailed Godwits, 31 Snipe, 9 Wigeon and 5 Swallows.

Photo of a small, unidentified spider.

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

2014-09-17

Yesterday’s godwit flock had moved on, with just 4 seen today. The roost of Lapwing had increased to c250 and they were joined briefly by a Ruff. It was viewable from the John Morgan hide but soon went out of view and I couldn’t relocate it from the tower hide. Still 2 female Pintail present and a few Wigeon. Best bird of the day though was a Bittern, seen by Mike Miles, flying off No.3 bed at dawn and heading over the river to No.4 bed.

Submitted by: David Spencer

 

Douglas Buchanan

2014-09-16

Taken from the footbridge. A pair of Mallard back in their breeding finery. The colours remind me of Dutch still life paintings.

Douglas Buchanan

Submitted by: Douglas Buchanan

 

Douglas Buchanan

2014-09-16

Just two of the 82 Black-tailed Godwits counted by Dave Spencer today.

Submitted by: Douglas Buchanan

 

2014-09-16

The highlight of today was 82 Black-tailed Godwits; initially 25 were feeding on the bed and then, mid-morning, 56 flew in from the east and were viewable from the tower hide. One from the Rotary hide (see photo) completed the total. This is the 2nd highest count for the reserve (100 were seen in April 2001). Other birds included 2 female Pintail,2 Green Sandpipers, 16 Snipe and c220 Lapwing.

Submitted by: David Spencer

 

David Bowman

2014-09-13

Close-up of a Brown Hawker from No.1 bed thsi morning.

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-13

Photo of a Buff-tailed? Bee from this morning on No.3 bed.

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-13

Photo of a Common Darter from No.3 bed this morning.

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-13

Photo of a Ruddy Darter, taken on No.1 bed this morning.

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-13

A beautiful, early autumn morning with some excellent sightings. We covered from No.3 bed in the west to Rixton Paddocks in the east, with butterflies and dragonflies increasing in numbers as the morning wore on. Highlights included: 3 Hobbies, 14 Black-tailed Godwits, 3 Green Sandpipers, 21 Snipe, 1 Kingfisher, 13 Wigeon, 150 Teal, 1 Water Rail, 1 Peregrine, 72 Swallows, 1 Yellowhammer, 1 Nuthatch, 1 Willow Tit, 48 Jays, 2 Mistle Thrushes, 5 Song Thrushes, 1 Grey Wagtail, 3 Blackcaps, 12 Chiffchaffs, 34 Robins and 225 Lapwings.

Other wildlife included: 5 Daubenton’s Bats and 2 Pipistrelle sp., (seen at dawn by Paul Hazlehurst), plus 5 Brown Hawkers, 6 Migrant Hawkers, 7 Ruddy and 8 Common Darters, 2 Emerald Damselflies, 1 Small Copper, 12 Red Admirals, 20 Speckled Woods, 3 Commas, 2 Small and 5 Green-veined Whites.

Photo of a Brown Hawker on No.1 bed

Cheers David (with David Spencer, Al Warford, Paul Hazlehurst, Brian Baird, Helen Allan, Diane Shepherd, Kelly Ainsworth and George Dunbar)

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

Dave Hackett

2014-09-10

a beautiful late summer’s day for my weekly walk around the reserve. A Great-crested Grebe with two well-grown young was on the canal opposite the golf course. Little Grebes were showing well on the No.1 bed pools and the reserve-wide total was eleven. Gadwall were still plentiful on No.3 bed although well down on last week’s record counts with around 200 present. Also on No.3 bed were 3 Black-tailed Godwit, 2 Green Sandpiper and about a hundred Lapwing. A further 75 Lapwing were on the Loop of No.4 bed. Butterflies were plentiful with reserve totals of 58 Speckled Wood, 12 Comma, 18 Red Admiral, 6 Small White and 3 Small Tortoiseshell. A little more unusual were a Painted Lady on No.2 bed and a female Brimstone on the Buddleias on the south bank of No.3 bed. Photo; Red Admiral.

Submitted by: Dave Hackett

 

David Bowman

2014-09-09

Dandelion seed-head on No.3 bed.

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-09

And another for Douglas to ID - I’ll have to buy an insect book!

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-09

Another one for Douglas to ID.

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-09

Close up of Migrant Hawker from No.3 bed today

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-09

Photo of a Migrant Hawker from No.3 bed today.

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-09

Another Common Darter from today on No.3 bed.

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-09

Photo of a Common Darter from No.3 bed today

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-09

On a warm afternoon on No.3 bed, the four Black-tailed Godwits were still present, along with 2 Green Sandpipers, 4 Snipe, 40 Lapwings, 1 Water Rail and 5 Wigeon. A female Marsh Harrier flew through, though I missed it as I was wandering around looking for more insects for Douglas to ID!

Here’s the first.

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-09

On a warm afternoon on No.3 bed, the four Black-tailed Godwits were still present, along with 2 Green Sandpipers, 4 Snipe, 40 Lapwings, 1 Water Rail and 5 Wigeon. A female Marsh Harrier flew through, though I missed it as I was wandering around looking for more insects for Douglas to ID!

Here’s the first

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

2014-09-09

Addendum to identification of Dave’s photos..

Spot the typo. I should have written hover fly.

I wrote that the drone Fly was probably Eristalis tenax but the are a number of similar species. With identification we need to see quite small features like leg colour and the pattern of veins on the wings. Douglas

Submitted by: Douglas Buchanan

 

2014-09-09

Species identification.Dave Bowman’s photographs.

  1. The spider is most likely Garden Spider, Araneus diadematus. The diagnostic feature is the white cross on the abdomen.

  2. The insect with longitudinal yellow stripes on the thorax is a overfly, Helophilus pendulous. My reference gives no common name. It is most frequent in damp places and the larvae grow in muddy water.

  3. The insect with the dark thorax is probably a Drone Fly Eristalis tenax. It is so named because it is similar to the honey bee drone. The larva is a rat-tailed maggot living in stagnant water.

My reference is the Collins guide to the Insects of Britain and Western Europe by Michael Chinery published in 1986. Now out of date. It does not for example include two recent garden pests, Lily Beetle and Rosemary Beetle. Time I bought a new book.

Submitted by: Douglas Buchanan

 

David Bowman

2014-09-08

Another species of bee from No.4 bed - again ID help welcome!

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-08

Photo of a spider from No.4 bed - ID welcome!

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-08

Common Darter on No.4 bed

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-08

A wander round the Loop of No.4 bed this afternoon, with not much moving but 120 Lapwings, a Redshank and 2 Willow Tits the main sightings. A few butterflies and dragonflies were evident, with 2 Migrant Hawkers, 10 Common Darters and 2 Southern Hawkers noted.

Photo of some kind of bee species any thoughts on ID welcome.

Cheers David

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

2014-09-07

approx. 2pm - One green sandpiper on right hand side of scrapes in front of John Morgan hide. also one kingfisher on reeds in front of same hide.

Submitted by: Malcolm Alderton

 

David Waterhouse

2014-09-07

Another Comma Butterfly (Polygonia c-album)

Also spotted about 5 Red Admirals, 3 small speckled woods, 2 Commas, and a Large White.

Submitted by: David Waterhouse

 

David Waterhouse

2014-09-07

Common Darter Dragonfly (Sympetrum striolatum)

Submitted by: David Waterhouse

 

David Waterhouse

2014-09-07

Dappled light over Black Locust Leaves (Robinia pseudoacacia)

Submitted by: David Waterhouse

 

David Waterhouse

2014-09-07

The last rays of evening sunlight through ferns.

Submitted by: David Waterhouse

 

2014-09-06

Our morning started really well on No.3 bed, with 4 Green Sandpipers, 2 Greenshanks and a female Garganey, picked up by David Spencer in front of the Morgan Hide. It then showed well, on and off, all morning. We then did the monthly Wildfowl Count for Nos.1 and 2 beds, including Bollin Point. Other sightings of interest included: 1 Green Woodpecker, 1 Kingfisher, 2 Peregrines, 13 Wigeon,c.200 Lapwings, 4 Snipe, 112 House Martins, 1 Sand Martin and 89 Swallows.

Cheers David (with David Spencer, Al Warford, Paul Hazlehurst, Helen Allan, Ste Dodd, Diane Shepherd and George Dunbar)

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

andy Weir

2014-09-05

Little Grebe (Tachybaptus ruficollis) taken from the John Morgan hide this morning.

Submitted by: Andy Weir

 

2014-09-01

M Pritchard reported at approx 15:00 1/9/14 - ” Whilst walking the dogs we saw what we think was a Marsh Harrier on the Eyes just above the weir on the closed off section of water.

Submitted by: Submitted by John Blundell

 

2014-09-04

Migrant Hawkers were numerous on no.3 and no.4 beds today; photo is of a female by the no.4 loop.

Submitted by: David Spencer

 

2014-09-04

Dave Riley trapped a female Redstart on No.1 bed this morning, his 3rd in the past 9 days. Elsewhere it was fairly quiet with just one Green Sandpiper from the John Morgan hide on no.3 and circa 90 Lapwing on the loop of No.4

Submitted by: David Spencer

 

Brian Gort

2014-09-03

Bit slow posting this on….. Apologies !

I managed to image this Otter on the river surrounding Bed 3 of the reserve. The image was taken at 9.37am on 2nd September 2014

Submitted by: Brian Gort

 

2014-09-01

Brian Martin and I made an evening visit in order to count the Gadwall. Our total was a minimum of 875 on No.3 bed alone. Also present were 309 Coot, a Green Sandpiper, and a female Pintail. A Wigeon was heard calling but not seen.

Submitted by: Dave Hackett

 

David Bowman

2014-09-02

On a beautiful, warm morning there were planty of butterflies and dragonlies around. The latter were being carried high on thermals, so it was no surprise to see two Hobbies hawking high to the east of No.3 bed. Four Green Sandpipers were reported from earlier in the morning and one was still showing by mid-morning. The usual Kingfisher kept visiting its perch in front of the Morgan Hide and a flock of 70 Shovelers were flushed from the back of the bed. Gadwall were everywhere, which is hardly surprising in the light of the recent record count of c.850.

Photo of a Sunflower from the North Meadow

Cheers David (with David Spencer)

Submitted by: David Bowman

 

David Bowman

2014-09-01

This morning’s Visible Migration Watch from Butchersfield Tip started well when a Hobby took a Swallow over the No.1 bed roost site. Despite the early drizzle, we slowly accumulated some decent counts, with the highlights being: 1 Swift, 210 Swallows, 140 House Martins, 4 Ravens, 1 Hobby, 5 Kestrels, 6 Sparrowhawks, 12 Common Buzzards, 5 Grey Partridges (on the fields to the north), 1 Kingfisher, 29 Chiffchaffs and 4 Goldcrests.

Photo of a Comma from this morning

Cheers David (with Dave Steel, David Spencer, Diane Shepherd and George Dunbar)

Submitted by: David Bowman